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Aloha!

I'm Gabriella Wisdom, welcome to the Postcards from Hawaii travel blog, an online vacay for the well-organised traveller

5 jet setter cocktails

5 jet setter cocktails

Finally my Food and Drink section is no longer empty! To kick off this category I’m sharing recipes for five cocktails inspired by my travels to Singapore, Hawaii, Brazil, Mexico and France. From sweet ones such as the Singapore Sling, to bitter like a Caipirinha, there’s a good chance one of these will tickle your fancy.

Each recipe below makes one glass.

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1. Singapore Sling

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Singapore

In 1915, Ngiam Tong Boon, a bartender at Raffles Hotel, created a tropical gin based cocktail disguised to look like fruit juice so that women had a socially acceptable way to drink alcohol in public. Recently celebrating it’s 100th anniversary, this world famous cocktail is available in many variations at Raffles Hotel, Singapore, but of course the OG is the best!

You can read more about the history of the Singapore Sling on the Raffles website.

30ml Gin

15ml Cherry brandy

7.5ml Cointreau

7.5ml Dom Benedictine 

A dash of Angostura Bitters

10ml Grenadine

15ml Lime juice

120ml Pineapple juice

A handful of ice

  • Put all the ingredients in the order listed above into a cocktail shaker.

  • Shake.

  • Add ice to your glass.

  • Strain into the glass.

  • Garnish with a slice of pineapple and/or a cherry.

2. Mai Tai

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Maui, Hawaii

Fun Fact: The Mai Tai gets its name from “maita’i roa ae!” which in Tahitian means “the very best!”

There are many variations of the Mai Tai, most focus on making it sweet with a mix of pineapple and orange juices but the original 1944 recipe is as follows:

60ml Aged dark rum

30ml Lime juice

15ml Orange curaçao

7ml Orgeat (almond) syrup

7ml Simple syrup

2 Handfuls of ice

  • Put all the ingredients in the order listed above into a cocktail shaker.

  • Shake.

  • Add ice to your glass.

  • Strain into the glass.

3. Caipirinha

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Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

It’s the national cocktail of Brazil and definitely an acquired taste. It’s sole liquid ingredient is Cachaça, which is a Brazilian hard liquor made from sugarcane. It only took two of these to send Michael running off on his own into the sea on Copacabana beach to frolic in what was very cold water in the middle of winter.

1/2 Lime cut into quarters

1 tsp Sugar

70ml Cachaça

A handful of ice

  • Put the lime and sugar in your glass.

  • Add the ice.

  • Pour in the Cachaça.

  • Stir.

4. Tequila Sunrise

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Cancún, Mexico

If you’re not up for tequila shots but don’t want to miss out on the fun, a Tequila Sunrise is a great way to sweeten up those otherwise bitter shots of tequila by making it a long drink accompanied by a lot of sugar. Despite it being a ridiculously popular drink in the 70s thanks to the Eagles and Rolling Stones, it actually originated in the 1930s.

45ml Tequila

90ml Orange juice

15ml Grenadine syrup

2 Handfuls of ice

  • Put the tequila and orange juice into a cocktail shaker.

  • Add ice.

  • Shake.

  • Add ice to your glass.

  • Strain into the glass.

  • Slowly pour in the grenadine syrup and let it settle at the bottom.

5. Monaco

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Paris, France

This fruity French beer cocktail makes drinking beer easier for those who aren’t keen on it. I came across this cocktail in a Parisienne café when it was recommended to me by a friend who knew I hated the taste of beer. It’s now my go-to summer drink.

170ml Pale ale

60ml Lemonade

45ml Grenadine syrup

2 Handfuls of ice

  • Pour the lemonade and grenadine syrup into a cocktail shaker.

  • Add ice.

  • Shake.

  • Add ice to your glass.

  • Strain into the glass.

  • Pour beer on top.

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So there you have it, five jet setter cocktails from around the world, which one will be your favourite?

Aloha, Gabriella

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