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Aloha!

I'm Gabriella Wisdom, welcome to the Postcards from Hawaii travel blog, an online vacay for the well-organised traveller

How to make a haku lei (flower crown)

How to make a haku lei (flower crown)

A haku lei is a lei worn around the head, otherwise known as a flower crown. Usually they are worn on special occasions such as luaus, weddings, graduations etc. “Haku” refers to the technique in which the flower crown is made either by braiding or sewing the flowers and foliage together.

I spent my birthday this year in Hawaii and the only present I asked Michael for was a haku lei. He chose a really simple but elegant one made from white plumeria, red rose petals and a few sprigs of something green. It was the first time I had seen a haku lei or flower crown that wasn’t woven or made with wire and tape. This one was made in the same traditional way as a lei: it was threaded and made adjustable with ribbons on each open end. 

Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg

So as it’s summer - and wedding season - I thought I would show you how to make your very own haku lei/flower crown using this same threading technique because it is much easier, cheaper and less time-consuming.

Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg
Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg

In this blog post I have featured two different types of haku lei so that you can decide which aesthetic you want. One is more elaborate; a tropical statement piece made with flowers I had hand selected from my local florists Crown House Flowers and The Rose Garden. The other is much smaller, more practical, and cost effective lei made with flowers from the supermarket.

Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg
Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg

As I mentioned this technique is a lot quicker and very simple, but it does include the use of a needle so please make sure that any children who wish to make this are accompanied by an adult.

Choosing your flowers and foliage

The four main points that you want to keep in mind when selecting your flowers are:

1. Weight

You don’t want the flowers to be too heavy. I learnt this after using large chrysanthemums in my larger haku lei, they will weigh down the crown and with little to support it, it will slip down your face. This doesn’t mean you can’t go for big flowers, just make sure you don’t select too many heavy ones.

Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg

2. Structure

As you are pushing a needle through them, you want your flowers to be quite firm. You will notice how fragile the rose petals are once they are pierced with the needle, they are ok because they will be sandwiched quite tightly, but you want your main flowers to stand strong. Example of flowers with structure are small chrysanthemums, germini, gerbera or scabiosa. Also keep in mind how big the base of the head is, for example: carnations. Although they have a beautiful flower, they have large heads which are hard to cover, leaving you with a big green gap. Look for flatter bases such as germini or small chrysanthemums. Speaking of structure, the same applies for the leaves. Try to pick strong leaves or ones that have a thick stem so they don’t fall apart when you put a needle through them.

Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg

3. Be thrifty

Take advantage of what you have around you. I’m not at all suggesting you decapitate your neighbour’s rose bush, but be more aware of the leaves on trees and bushes. Picking a selection of leaves from your garden or the park will save you money. They don’t even have to be particularly interesting ones either, they can be pulled off the stems of the supermarket flowers if need be! Of course, if you are going for a big, bold tropical look, I strongly recommend going to a florist because they are your best chance of finding philodendron or umbrella fern.

4. Quantity 

Don’t get too carried away! It’s so easy to do, especially if you are buying them in a florist, and it will surprise you how little you need. For the smaller of the two haku lei that I made, I only bought three bunches of flowers and made the rest up with petals from two different coloured roses and leaves from my garden, these three bunches could easily have made two haku lei.

Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg

5. Cost

For the larger haku lei I wanted bigger flowers and tropical leaves that would make a statement. I bought a selection of flowers that featured zantedeschia, dahlias, zinnia and more from two florists and together that cost £30. I am aware that this is costly and really only viable for a special occasion, but they did make a wonderful statement haku lei that reminded me most of the ones in Hawaii. I didn’t use all of the flowers so I put the remaining together in a vase to make the most of the money spent.

Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg

For the smaller and cheaper haku lei, I used flowers from my local Morrisons supermarket. I bought two bouquets of small chrysanthemums in pink and orange and one bouquet of white germini, to accompany these I used the remaining rose petals I bought in the florist and a selection of leaves from the garden. The bouquets were £3.50 each or two for £5, so collectively I spent £8.50. I know, much more reasonable, that’s why I’ve made two versions for you!

Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg

What you need

  • Scissors (for cutting the ribbon and thread)

  • Secateurs (for cutting the flowers and leaves)

  • Tape measure (for measuring the thread)

  • 6 or 9 inch upholstery needle (to pierce and sew the flowers)

  • 2 metres of extra strong thread (to hold the lei together)

  • 1 metre of ribbon (to tie the open ends of the haku lei together)

  • A selection of flowers and leaves (I don’t need to explain this one)

Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg

Instructions

Whether you have bought your flowers from a florist or the supermarket, make sure that you sit them in water until you are ready so they remain fresh for as long as possible.

Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg

1. Start by beheading your flowers with care using the secateurs. You want to cut as close to the bottom of the head of the flower as possible, removing all of the stem. Don’t cut all of them, start with a few and cut as you go, this way if you don’t use them all, you can put the remaining flowers in a vase.

Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg
Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg

2. If you are using rose petals, gently pluck the petals off the head.

Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg

3. Using the tape measure, measure out and cut 2 metres of the thread.

4. Thread it through the needle so that the thread is doubled (the needle is in the middle of the thread).

5. Tie the ends together with a couple of knots.

Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg

6. Begin to thread the flowers on in the order you want, being careful with the point of the needle as you do. As you push the first flowers down the thread towards the knots, leave about 10cm of the thread so the flowers don’t fall off and that you have enough thread to tie the ribbon to.

Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg
Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg

7. Thread on your flowers and leaves in whatever order you fancy. It is up to you if you want to create a pattern or not, but if there are certain flowers that you want to use at the front, be aware of how far you have worked down the thread. Also every head size is unique so keep holding it up to yours to gauge how much further you have to go.

Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg

8. The reason I recommend using a longer needle is because leis are made with one (unfortunately I couldn’t find any at a reasonable cost) because they make the process quicker. With a longer needle, you can thread on multiple flowers and then push a larger section down the thread.

Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg

9. Once you have your desired length in flowers, cut the thread at the eye of the needle.

Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg
Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg

10. Tie the ends that you just cut together with a couple of knots.

Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg

11. Cut the ribbon in half and tie one piece to each side of the lei. Tie the ribbon as close to the flowers as you can get without damaging the flowers.

PFH Top Tip: You can buy a metre of ribbon from any haberdashery for under £1 but if you really want to be thrifty, cut out the ribbon loops found in dresses and blouses (the ones that keep your garment from falling off the hanger - provided you don’t need them). They will be plenty long enough and they’re already a pair!

Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg

12. Make sure the ribbon and thread is securely tied to each other before cutting the excess thread.

Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg

13. All you have left to do is carefully lift your haku lei to your head and tie the ribbons together at the back of your head. A bow with a double knot will secure it. Now go take heaps of photos and if you post them, tag them with #postcardsfromhawaiiblog.

Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg
Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg

If you are making your haku lei for an occasion it is best to make it on the day so that the flowers are their freshest selves. If you want to make the most out of, sprinkle it with water and store it in the fridge. Depending on the flowers you chose it can last a couple more days.

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Now you know exactly how to make your very own Hawaiian haku lei inspired flower crown you can make them for all sorts of occasions: weddings, baby showers, birthday parties etc.

Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg
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Postcards from Hawaii Haku Lei Flower Crown.jpg

If you do make one please share them using #postcardsfromhawaiiblog and I will share them on my Instagram stories.

Aloha, Gabriella

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